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Individual Assessments

The assessments below are a mix of self-reports by students and reports completed by an adult to assess the student and his or her behavior. Also, some of these assessments can be used as pre- and post-tests to ascertain the impact of a program or curriculum.

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Acceptance of Outgroups – 2000 (click for details)

Measures student “social distance” from people in other groups. For grades 3-4. Student self-report on 12-items using a multiple choice scale of 1=would not, 2= might, and 3= would work with. Author: Child Development Project. 1993. Contact: Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.
Elementary social distance.

Altruistic Behavior – 2000 (click for details)


Elementary. Ten-item scale for grades 3-5 that measures students’ self-reports of their own behaviors that helped others. Author: Child Development Project. 1993.
Middle School. Nine-item questionnaire with responses based on frequency scale of five choices (1=never to 5 =more than 10 times). Author: Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact: Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300. Phone: 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.
Elementary and Middle School. Self-report of helping others.

Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES) – 1972 (click for details)


Measure of emotional empathy. The 30-item questionnaire has a 9-step response format (+4= very strong agreement to -4= very strong disagreement) to gauge empathic tendencies. Can be administered to a group or inSPANidual, age 15 or older. Test can be done with paper and pencil or on computer; administer time is 10 minutes. Software is available for administering, scoring and interpreting. Spanish and French translations. Author and publisher: Albert Mehrabian, Ph.D., available via: www.kaaj.com/psych/scales.
Computer form available. Spanish and French translations. Adolescent and older.

Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (BarOn EQ-I™) – 2002 (click for details)


Measure of Emotional Intelligence applicable for varied applications, including education. Measures ability of inSPANidual to deal with daily environmental demands and pressures. EQ-I has 133 items, and four validity indices. Assesses the 15 components: emotional self-awareness, assertiveness, self-regard, self-actualization, independence, empathy, interpersonal relationship, social responsibility, problem solving, flexibility, reality resting, stress tolerance, impulse control, optimism and happiness. Self-report assessment for inSPANiduals 16 years and older. Pencil and paper or online. Instrument takes 30 minutes. Multiple languages available. Manuals are available to help administer and interpret EQ-I results. User’s manual and Administrator’s guide. There are multiple report options depending on application. Author: Reuven Bar-On, Ph.D. Please use Google search for contact information.

BarOn EQ-I Youth Version (BarOn EQ-i:YV™) – 2000 (click for details)


Assesses the emotional intelligence of children and adolescents aged 7 to 18 years. Self-report. 30 minutes. Short version available that takes 10 minutes (can do online) and is ideal for screening large groups; software available and online. Authors: Reuven Bar-On, Ph.D., and Jim Parker, Ph.D. Hand scored (scoring option) and Profile reports for both. Please use Google search for contact information.

Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (EQ-i:S) – 2002 (click for details)


Short version of EQ-I, for ages 16 and older. Self-report takes 10-15 minutes. This assessment measures: intrapersonal, interpersonal, stress management, adaptability, general mood, positive impression, and inconsistency index. Options include handscored, software, online, and scoring service offered. Feedback Reports are available. Author: Reuven Bar-On, Ph.D. The Emotional Quotient Inventories are available from Multi-Health Systems, Inc. www.mhs.com.
Original emotional intelligence assessment. Multiple versions, reports and applications.

Conflict Resolution Skill (Scale) – 1993 (click for details)


Measures students’ ability to suggest solutions to interpersonal conflicts that take both party’s positions into account. Self-report with 4-item situations with five-point Likert-type scale. Elementary student (grades 3-5). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact: Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.
Elementary. Ability to resolve conflicts.

Character Traits – 1996 (click for details)


A measure of students’ perceptions of their peers’ behavior on 16 character trait dimensions: respect for self/others/and property, honesty, responsibility/dependability/accountability, kindness, cooperation, self-control/discipline, forgiveness, integrity/fairness, perseverance, diligence, humility, compassion/empathy, patriotism/citizenship, tolerance/SPANersity, courtesy/politeness, and sportsmanship. There are 96-items that are used to measure the aforementioned. Test can also be used by teacher to measure perception of student’s behavior on these character traits. Survey is available for free from author. Instructions, instrumentation, computer scanforms, analysis of data, and report scoring available. Author: Clete Bulach, PhD. Contact: Professional Development and Assessment Center, Clete Bulach, PhD. Phone: 770-214-8318, cbulach@comcast.net. See www.westga.edu/~cbulach.
Student-peer character traits. Can be used by teacher.

Child Behavior Scale – 1996 (click for details)


Teacher self-report measure that assesses the behavior of young children (ages 4-6) in peer contexts, such as classrooms. Six subscales measure these dimensions of young children’s behavior in peer settings: aggressive with peers, prosocial with peers, excluded by peers, asocial with peers, hyper-distractible, and anxious-fearful. There are 59-items with three response choices measuring these dimensions. Author: G. W. Ladd. 1996. (Article: The Child Behavior Scale: A teacher-report measure of young children’s aggressive, withdrawn, and prosocial behaviors, Developmental Psychology. Vol. 32, pp. 1008-1024, authors: G. W. Ladd and S. M. Profilet.) Contact: Gary W. Ladd, Arizona State University. Gary.Ladd@asu.edu.
Teacher self-report. Young children’s behavior in peer settings.

Children’s Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Locus of Control (CNSIE) – 1973 (click for details)


Scale designed to measure a child’s sense of internal and external control. Instrument has a 40-item dichotomous response scale to measure perceived control in affiliation, achievement and dependency. Scale has been used in over 1,400 studies, still being updated. (Article: A Locus of Control Scale for Children, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1973, Vol. 40, n.1, pp. 148-154, authors: Stephen Nowicki and Bonnie R. Strickland.) Contact: Stephen Nowicki. Phone: 404-727-7454. snowicki@emory.edu.
Internal-External sense of control. Elementary and Secondary.

Citizenship Scale – 2008 (click for details)


Student self-report on issues of honesty, trustworthiness, rule following and conscientiousness. The citizenship measure has 12-items with mostly five-point Likert-type scale responses offered (never agree to always agree). For elementary and secondary school students. Author: Darcia Narvaez. 2008. Instrument and guide available from author. Contact: Darcia Narvaez, Ethical Development and Education laboratory, University of Notre Dame, 118 Haggar Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556. Phone: 574-631-7835. dnarvaez@nd.edu.
Elementary and secondary students. Ethical focus or motivation.

Commitment to Ethical Goodness Scale Version 2.0 – 2008 (click for details)


Scale designed to measure the effectiveness of moral character education programs in increasing ethical focus and motivation. Fifteen-item scale measures: moral locus of control, ethical goodness, and ethical self-regulation. Respondents given a five-point Likert-type scale (1=always agree to 5=never agree) choice for all but two items. For use with elementary and secondary students. Authors: Darcia Narvaez, Tonia Bock, and Jenny L. Vaydich. 2008. For instrument and guide, contact Darcia Narvaez, Ethical Development and Education Laboratory, Univesity of Notre Dame, 118 Haggar Hall, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556. Phone: 574-631-7835. dnarvaez@nd.edu.
Elementary and secondary students. Ethical identity. Program effectiveness.

Commitment to Democratic Values – 1993 (click for details)


Elementary students respond to 10 situations (e.g. students who get in trouble on one field trip should not be allowed to go on the next field trip) to determine their level of commitment to democratic values. Instrument has a five-point Likert scale (1= Disagree a lot to 5= Agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300. Phone: 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.
Democratic values. Situational.

Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) – Adult & School – 1981 (click for details)


Measure of attitudes of the self in four domains: peers, parents, school, and personal interests. The scores are for General Self, Social Self-Peers, Home-Parents, School-Academic, Total Self Score, and Lie. There are two versions (age-related). Both tests are paper and pencil. Handscoring with key. The responses to the items require a “like me” or “not like me” response. Group administration. No time limit, but average test time is 15 minutes. Hand scoring with key.
School Form (CSEISC) is for 8-15 year olds. It has 50-items that require a like me/not like me response. There is an 8-item Lie Scale designed to assess defensiveness.
Adult Form (CSEI) is for ages 16 and over. Is an adaptation of the School Short Form of 25-items. It does not include the Lie Scale.
Author: Stanley Coopersmith. 1981. Available from Mind Garden, Inc. 855 Oak Grove Ave. Suite 215, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Phone: 650-322-6300. Contact. www.mindgarden.com.
Multi-age self-esteem. InSPANidual, classroom and pre-post evaluation. Language translations available.

Delinquency – 2000 (click for details)


Assessment for Middle School aimed at how often a student has engaged in delinquent behaviors: from drug use, weapons, fights, theft, assault, to arrest. The self-report has 15-items with frequency response scale. Frequency response scale (1=never to 5=more than 10 times). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300. Phone: 800-666-7270, www.devstu.org.
Middle School delinquency.

Defining Issues Test (DIT-1 in 1979) (DIT-2 in 1999) (click for details)


Instrument that assesses moral development by providing moral dilemnas to which respondent then answer questions (with Likert-type scale) and then prioritize which of the questions/statements responded to are most important. Analyzed for three schemas of moral reasoning: personal interests, maintaining norms and the post-conventional schema. The moral dilemnas are read, then the respondent answers a basic question about the solution/dilemma, followed by 12-items using a five-point Likert-type scale (great to no). Final task is to prioritize the 12-items in priority order from first to fourth most important. Paper and pencil test. Test comes with Instruction booklets, answer sheets, and guides for both tests. Answers are scored by test provider; they supply a report and subject scores. There are three versions:
DIT-1: Contains six dilemnas. (12 issue statement after each story). (Author: James Rest. 1979).
DIT- short form: Consists of first three dilemnas of DIT-1. (Author: James Rest. 1979).
DIT-2: Consists of five dilemnas (12-issue statements after each story). (Authors: James Rest, D. Narvaez, M. Bebeau and S. Thoma. 1999).
Contact The Center for the Study of Ethical Development, University of Minnesota & University of Alabama, 305a Carmichael Hall, university of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0231, ph 205-348-4571, ethicalstudy@bamaed.ua.edu. See also www.centerforthestudyofethicaldevelopment.net
Moral development. Use of moral dilemas.

Drug Use -2000 (click for details)


Assessment with 14-items regarding student use of drugs. Self-report for middle school students. First nine questions ask about frequency of use of tobacco and alcohol; questions posed in a variety of ways to elicit responses. Responses are based on frequency (I don’t to high usage). The last five questions ask students about their use of and knowledge of five illegal drugs/substances (cocaine, heroin, amphetamines, tranquilizers and barbituates). There are four response choices: never heard of it, heard of it but never have used, have used but not in the past month and have used in the last 30 days. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle School student self-report on drug use.

Educational Aspirations -2000 (click for details)


Single-item question about what level of education a student would like to go. Five possible responses (1= go to high school to 5= finish college).

Educational Expectations -2000 (click for details)


Single-item question about what level of education a student thinks they will achieve. Five possible responses (1= go to high school to 5 = finish college).
For middle school students. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Short item assessment to ascertain education ambitions/expections.

Ego Orientation -1993 (click for details)


Assessment that asks elementary students to respond to four questions regarding times they feel best in school. Five Likert-type scale responses (1= disagree a lot to 5 = agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary.

Enjoyment of Helping Others -2000 (click for details)


Assessment for elementary students with 5- items with five Likert- type scale responses (1= Disagree a lot to 5 = Agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary.

Extrinsic Academic Motivation -1993 (click for details)


Elementary. Students respond to six- item questionnaire to assess student academic motivation by external motivators (grades, teacher, get in trouble). Three-point response scale (1= Not a reason, 2= A small reason to 3 = A big reason). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org .
Motivation – Student completes.

Extrinsic Prosocial Motivation Scale -1993 (click for details)


Instrument measures students’ inclination to act in prosocial ways in order to gain rewards or avoid punishment. Six-item scale with three response choices (not a reason, a small reason, a big reason). Elementary grades 3-4. Author: Child Development Project. 1993. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org .
Elementary. Prosocial motivation.

Free Time Motivation Scale for Adolescents -2003 (click for details)


Assessment designed to measure the motivation of 6th-8th graders in the use of their free time (versus educational motivation). Self-report questionnaire that asks students to respond to statements that describe their reason for doing what they do in their free time. The responses are given on a 5 point Likert-type scale (agree to strongly disagree). Measures five forms of motivation: amotivation, extrinsic, introjected, indentified and intrinsic. Builds on work by Ryan and Connell (1989) and Pelletier et al. (1996). Authors: Cheryl K. Baldwin and Linda Caldwell. 2003. (Article: Development of the Free Time Motivation Scale for Adolescents, Journal of Leisure Research, Vol. 35, n 2, p. 129, authors Cheryl K. Baldwin and Linda Caldwell.)
Motivation.

Frequency of Delinquent Behaviors -2000 (click for details)


Assessment for elementary students (grades 3-4) aimed at how often a student has engaged in delinquent behaviors: from skipping school, stealing, physical aggression (threats to actual fights including gang fights), to weapon possession. The self-report has 10-items with frequency scale (range of five choices: 1= never to 5=10 or more times). Child Development Project. 1993. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary delinquency.

Global Self Esteem -1993 (click for details)


Measures Middle School students on how they view themselves. Students answer 3-items with a five-point Likert-type scale response (disagree a lot to agree a lot). 2000. Author: Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student self-awareness.

Group Openness and Trust -1993 (click for details)


Measure levels of openness and trust within a group or between the leader and the group. Has five subscales for measuring truth: character, truthfulness, ability, confidentiality, and predictability; two subscales for measuring openness: listening and telling. Survey is available for free from author. Instructions, instrumentation, computer scanforms, analysis of data, and report scoring available. Author: Clete Bulach, PhD. Contact. Professional Development and Assessment Center, Clete Bulach, PhD, ph 770-214-8318, cbulach@comcast.net. See www.westga.edu/~cbulach
Trust in group or between leader and group.

Intrinsic Academic Motivation -1993 (click for details)


Elementary. Students respond to six- item questionnaire to assess student academic motivators by internal motivators (work is interesting, want to learn as much as can, help me in future). Three-point response scale (1= not a reason, 2= small reason, 3=big reason). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Motivation – Student completes.

Instrinsic Prosocial Motivation Scale -2000 (click for details)


Instrument measures students’ inclination to act in pro-social ways because of personal feelings of empathy, concern for others, or commitment to interpersonal values. Six-item scale with three response choices (not a reason, a small reason, a big reason). Elementary grades 3-4. Author: Child Development Project. 1993. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary. Empathy. Caring.

Interpersonal Reactivity Index -1994 (click for details)


Index is a 28-item self-report survey of Likert-type items, with four subscales: perspective taking, fantasy, empathic concern, and personal distress. Author: Mark Davis. Index is in book, Empathy: A Social Psychological Approach by Mark Davis. Westview Press. 1994.
Student self-report index published in book.

Liking for School (click for details)


Elementary. Seven-item questionnaire with five-point Likert-type scale response (1= disagree a lot to 5=agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Developmental Studies Center, www.devstu.org.
Middle School. Six-item questionnaire with five-point Likert-type scale response as above. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270, www.devstu.org
Short student-report. May combine with other assessments.

Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Questionnaire for Young Children -1992 (click for details)


Students are asked to respond to 24-items (with 8 filler items to make students more comfortable). Responses are based on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Authors; Jude Cassidy and Steven R. Asher. 1992. (Article: Loneliness and Peer Relations in Young Children, Child Development, 1992, Vol. 63, n.5A, p. 350-365, authors Jude Cassidy and Steven R. Asher). Contact Jude Cassidy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, ph 301-405-4973. jcassidy@psyc.umd.edu
Elementary/young children. Loneliness and peer relations.

Loneliness at School -1993 (click for details)


Elementary. Assessment to gauge students’ sense of friends and peers to talk to at school. The self-report has 9-items with three Likert- type scale responses (1= Not at all true, 2= Sort of true, 3 = Very True). Child Development Project. 1993. Developmental Studies Center.
Middle School: Assessment to gauge students’ sense of friends and peers to talk to at school. The self-report has 8-items with three Likert-type scale response choices. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary and Middle school. Sense of friends and peers.

Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) -2000 (click for details)


Ability test of emotional intelligence for adults ages 17 and older. Consists of 141-items. Respondents are asked to identify emotions, generate a mood and solve problems with that mood, define the causes of different emotions, and determine how to include our thinking in situations that involve ourselves or other people. Paper and pencil test; answer sheets scored by test publisher. On-line version available. Test time about 30-45 minutes. Two methods of scoring, consensus scoring and expert scoring, offers predictive validity for outcomes such as pro-social behavior, deviancy and academic performance. Authors: John D. Mayer, Peter Salovey, and David R. Caruso. 2000. Contact. Multi-Health Systems, Inc. www.mhs.com
High School and adults. Emotional intelligence.

Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale -1964 (click for details)


Personality test developed to account for tendency to respond to the questions in a socially desirable way. This test is for adults, but has been adapted by several authors for children preschool to high school. Authors: Douglas P. Crowne and David Marlowe. Book: The Approval Motive: Studies in Evaluative Dependence by Douglas P. Crowne and David Marlowe. 1964. Wiley. New York.
Personality.

Misconduct at School -2000 (click for details)


Student self-report on their school conduct for past school year. Four-items with frequency response scale (1=never to 5 = more than 10 times). For middle school students. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school self-report on school conduct.

Moral Theme Inventory (MTI) Version 1.1 -2001 (click for details)


Provides a measure of moral development for younger children and can be used to identify and measure developmental differences in moral thinking among children. The MTI consists of four stories about moral dilemnas that cover aspects of: ethical sensitivity, judgment, motivation and action. Requires children to listen to each story and complete five tasks after each of the four stories is read. The five tasks include: complete 10 true-false comprehension questions, rate four vignettes for how close each one’s theme matched the original story’s theme, using a five-point Likert-type scale, select the vignette that best matched the theme of the original story, rate each of seven or eight messages for how well they match the theme of the original story using a five-point Likert-type scale, and finally, select two message choices that best match the theme of the original story from the list of choices just rated. The test requires a reader or use of audio tape available from author. Test requires 50 minutes for each pair of stories administered. Pencil and paper. Scoring is included in guide. May be able to administer two of the four stories and obtain similar test reliability scores. MTI may be used only with permission of author who will provide audio tape, copy of each story, MTI guide; downpayment required and returned upon receipt of audio tape and copies of data file. Authors: Darcia Narvaez and Tonia Bock. 2001. Contact: Darcia Narvaez, Ethical Development and Education Laboratory, Univesity of Notre Dame, 118 Haggar Hall, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, ph 574-631-7835. dnarvaez@nd.edu
Young children. Moral Development. Vignette with response. Data being collected.

Perceived Social Competence Scale -1993 (click for details)


Measures students’ assessment of their own social skills. Students answer 10-items. Elementary student level. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary students self-report social skills.

Personal Characteristics and School Safety Survey -1999 (click for details)


Measure of student perception of their exposure to bullying behavior. Measures the following dimensions: where bullying occurs, the type and reason for bullying, the way students are treated, how bullying is reported, and feelings of self-efficacy. Survey is available for free from author. Instructions, instrumentation, computer scanforms, analysis of data, and report scoring available. Authors: C. R. Bulach and J. Penland. Contact. Professional Development and Assessment Center, Clete Bulach, PhD, ph 770-214-8318, cbulach@comcast.net. See www.westga.edu/~cbulach
Student perception of exposure to bullying.

Prevalence of Positive Involvement in School Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Assessment for middle school students with 5-items to report the behavior of their peers/friends. Five possible responses (1= none to 5 = all or almost all). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on behavior of peers.

Prevalence of Involvement in Positive Social Activities Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Two-item questionnaire asking middle school students about their friends’ engagement in activities. Five possible responses. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on peer activities.

Prevalence of Positive Peer Pressure Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Three-item questionnaire for middle school. Asks students about what their friends would do if they were/were about to engage in negative or risk-taking behaviors (drugs, alcohol). Five possible responses (1=none to 5= all or almost all). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on peer pressure.

Prevalence of Delinquent Behaviors Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Assessment with 13-items for middle school. Asks students to respond to whether their friends (kids they hang around) have been involved in delinquent behaviors. Their response choices range from no peers do this to all or almost all peers do this. Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on peer delinquency.

Prevalence of School Misconduct Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Brief 3-item assessment for middle school students asking them about the behavior of their peers/friends. Five possible responses (1 = none to 5 = all or almost all). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on peer conduct.

Prevalence of Drug Use Among Friends -2000 (click for details)


Assessment for middle school students with 4-items. Asks students to respond to if and how often their friends are involved in drug use. Five possible responses (1 = none to 5 = all or almost all).
Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school student report on peer drug use.

Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale -1965 (click for details)


Measure of self-esteem has 10-items. This measure, along with 10 other measures of self-esteem are included in the appendix of landmark book that explores nature of and measurement of young people’s self-esteem, its influence and causes in a variety of contexts. Book: Society and the Adolescent Self-Image by Morris Rosenberg. 1965. Princeton University Press. Princeton, NJ.
Adolescent self-esteem. One of ten measures of self-esteem in book.

School Achievement Motivation Rating Scale (SAMRS) -1997 (click for details)


Teachers rate students on 15 behavioral descriptors on a five-point scale (always to never). Correleted with 11 well-established achievement and psychological measures including Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, and the Test Anxiety Scale for Children.
(Article: Development and Validation of the School Achievement Motivation Rating Scale, Educational and Pscyhological Measurement, 1997, Vol.57, p 292-305, author Lian-Hwang Chiu.)
Teacher completes. Instrument in article.

School Social Behavior Scales, Second Edition (SBSS-2) -2002 (click for details)


School-based instrument to assess social competence and antisocial behavior for grades K-12. Takes approximately 10 minutes. Given InSPANidually. Works well in combination with Home and Community Social Behavior Scales (HCSBS), by same author, a home behavior rating. Author: Kenneth W. Merrell. 2002.
Available through Brookes Publishing, 1-800-638-3775. www.brookespublishing.com
School behavior- inSPANidual (K-12).

Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT) -1998 (click for details)


Assessment that measures emotional intelligence, follows Salovey and Mayer model of emotional intelligence. Self-report test has 33-items with items relating to: appraisal and expression of emotion, regulation of emotion, and utilization of emotion. Author: Nicola Schutte, Ph.D. 1998. Contact author, nschutte@metz.une.edu.au
Emotional Intelligence. Expression, regulation and utilization.

Second Step® Social- Emotional Learning Checklist (SELC) -2004 (click for details)


Checklist for teachers to assess how often they support students’ use of social and emotional skills outside of Second Step lesson instruction. Checklist areas look at emotion management, perspective taking, and problem solving. Can be used as a cue to teachers of areas where they can support students’ application of social emotional skills they are acquiring. Program-based (Second Step®). Nine-item questionnaire uses frequency as a measure. Designed to be used monthly by teachers using this program. Committee for Children. 2004. www.cfchildren.org
Program oriented. Teacher cue for enforcing social-emotional skills.

Self-Esteem Scale -1993 (click for details)


General. Measure of students feelings about self. Elementary students answer 4-items, with five-point Likert-type scale response. Author: Child Development Project. 1993.
Academic. Measure of students feelings about self with regard to academic performance. Elementary students answer 5-items on a five-point Likert-type scale. Author: Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.

Sense of Autonomy -2000 (click for details)


Measures elementary students’ feeling that they can make decisions that affect them. Self-report assessment with 8-items, with 3-point Likert-type response scale. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org.
Elementary. Autonomy.

Sense of Efficacy -1993/2000 (click for details)


Elementary. Ten-item questionnaire designed to assess student’s self-report on their ability to achieve desired results in school situations, emotional control and decision-making. Five-point Likert-type scale responses (1 = not sure at all to 5= very sure). Author: Child Development Project. 1993.
Middle School: Nine item questionnaire, self-report on ability to achieve desired results in school and emotional and decision-making contexts. Five Likert type scale responses ( 1= not at all sure to 5= very sure). Author: Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary and Middle. Self-report of ability to achieve desired results. Emotional control.

Six Seconds Emotional Intelligence Assessment (SEI™) – Youth Version -2007 (click for details)


Assesses emotional competencies and life-outcomes (health, relationship quality, life satisfaction, personal achievement, self-efficacy, and overall composite). Based on Six Seconds Model of Emotional Intelligence that has three components: Know yourself (awareness), Choose yourself (self-management and direction) and Give yourself (choices and sense of purpose), with eight competencies: enhance emotional literacy, recognize patterns, apply consequential thinking, navigate emotions, engage intrinsic motivation, practice optimism, increase empathy and pursue noble goals. Standardized and validated for ages 8-18. A paper version is available for qualified research/educators in exchange for data. Group reports available. Reports generated include scatter plot data, EQ profiles and an EQ Yardstick. 1997-2008. Contact: Marsha Rideout, Director of Instruction, ph 650-685-9885 or marsha@6seconds.org See also www.6seconds.org
Emotional intelligence. Paper and pencil or online.

Social and Personal Responsibility Scale -1981 (click for details)


Measure used in the Experiential Education Evaluation Project. There are four subscales that measure the extent of: responsible attitudes, competence to act responsibly, sense of efficacy to take responsibility, and perform responsible acts.. The scale has 21-items; two part responses ask students if the statement on the right or left is most like them, then they need to score whether it is almost always true or sometimes true. Middle School and High School level. Free download of the guide is on contact website. Authors: Dan Conrad and Diane Hedin. 1981. Contact. Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearninghouse, ph 1-866-245-7378, orders@servicelearning.org. See www.servicelearning.org
Evaluate sense of responsibility. Growth.

Social Skills Inventory (SSI) -2002 (click for details)


Measure of basic social skills that form basis of social competence. Adult instrument has multiple applications including applications for inSPANidual, management and leadership training. Inventory has 90-items that cover six domains: emotional expressivity, emotional sensitivity, emotional control, social expressivity, social sensitivity, and social control. Respondents use a five-point scale. Each of the six scales receives a score, then a total score for global social intelligence is reported. Online version available. Author: Ronald E. Riggio. Test available from Mind Garden, Inc. 855 Oak Grove Avenue, Suite 215, Menlo Park, CA 94025, ph 650-322-6300. www.mindgarden.com
Adult social competencies. Requires eighth grade reading level. Language translations available.

SSRS Social Skills Rating System -1990 (click for details)


Multi-source, multi-dimensional instrument of student social and academic functioning where parents, teachers and students rate student behavior. Three levels offered: Preschool (ages 0-3), Elementary (grades K-6), and Secondary (grades 7-12). Three forms: Teacher, Parent, Student. Assesses the child in three domain: social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence. The subscales are: cooperation, assertion, responsibility, empathy, self-control, externalizing problems, hyperactivity. Student test is a self-report for grades 3+. Can be administered inSPANidually or in group. Time to administer is 15-25 minutes. Paper and pencil rating scale. Assessment can be administered by range of personnel, but must be interpreted by professional trained in psychological testing. Authors: Frank M. Gresham and Stephen N. Elliott. 1990. Contact. Pearson Education, Inc. www.pearsonschool.com
Social skills and problem behaviors. Major evaluation used by Responsive Classroom.

Student Participation Questionnaire -1995 (click for details)


Elementary questionnaire that reports data on teacher-report instrument to measure the degree of educational engagement in elementary students. A factor analysis provides three reliable subscales: effort, initiative and non-participatory behavior. The Student Participation Questionnaire consists of 29 items rated by the teacher according to frequency of occurrence (1=never; 5=always). (Article: Disruptive and inattentive-withdrawn behavior and achievement among fourth grader, The Elementary School Journal, 1995, Vol. 95, 421-434, authors Jeremy D. Finn, G.M. Pannozzo, and K.E Voelkl. Elementary Questionnaire can be viewed in article.).
Fourth-Grade Student Participation Questionnaire – Developed to measure degree of educational engagement in fourth-grade students. Same scale as elementary. 29-items, plus 2- items related to academic achievement and placement completed by teacher. Author Jeremy D. Finn.
Eighth-Grade Student Participation Questionnaire – Developed to measure same as above. Teacher completes 14-item questionnaire.
(Fourth and Eighth Grade questionnaires can be viewed in Project STAR and Beyond: Database User’s Guide, January 1, 2007, Heros, Inc. www.heros-inc.org.)
Contact: Jeremy D. Finn, University of Buffalo. finn@buffalo.edu
Teacher report. Elementary, Fourth and Eighth Grade Questionnaires.

Swinburne University of Technology (SUEIT) Adolescent Self-Report Version -2003 (click for details)


A measure of adolescent emotional intelligence. Students complete a 57-item self-reports of classroom behavior, a checklist of major life events and questions relating to dealing with emotions. Has five-point scale (very seldom to very often). Takes 15-20 minutes to complete. Authors: Ben Palmer, Con Stough, and Stefan Luebbers. (2003 copyright). Center for Neurophsychology, Swinburne University of Technology, Centre for Neuropyschology, P.O. Box 218 Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia 3122. Contact. Dr. Karen Hansen, khansen@swin.edu.au
Adolescent emotional intelligence.

Task Orientation -2000 (click for details)


Measure with 8–items that ask about the times an elementary student feels best in school (keep busy, learn something interesting, solve a problem by working hard). Five Likert- type scale responses (1= disagree a lot to 5 = agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary.

Task Orientation Toward Learning -2000 (click for details)


Measure with 8-items that ask about the times a middle school student feels best in school (keep busy, learn something interesting, solve a problem by working hard). Five Likert- type scale responses (1= disagree a lot to 5 = agree a lot). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle school.

The Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth -2006/biennial updates (click for details)


Comprehensive survey conducted biennially by the Josephson Institute of high school students nation-wide. The survey measures the student self-report values, attitudes and behavior. Participation in the survey is voluntary on a school basis. The survey is completed on-line. It is compiled in a national report. No inSPANidual school information is reported. Schools participate for free; school reports are available to them from the Josephson institute. Josephson Institute. (biennial update). Josephson Institute/CHARACTER COUNTS! National Office, 9841 Airport Blvd., #300, Los Angeles, CA 90045, ph 310-846-4800. http://charactercounts.org
National survey. School data available only to school, not disaggregated for general public.

The Self-Perception Profile for Children -1985 (click for details)


Instrument assesses a child’s (ages 8-13 years) self-perception in five domains: scholastic competence, athletic competence, social acceptance, physical appearance and behavioral conduct, and in addition expresses global self-worth. There are 36-items. This is a revision of the Perceived Competence Scale for Children (1982). Author: Susan Harter, PhD. 1985. Instrument available for use in research, program evaluation, and educational and clinical assessment at the group and inSPANidual level for fee to cover costs to reproduce and mail. Theoretical and research background described in The Construction of the Self: A Developmental Perspective, Susan Harter, PhD. See Guilford Publications, Inc. 1-800-365-7006 or www.guilford.com. Contact author: Dr. Susan Harter, University of Denver, Department of Psychology, 155 S. Race Street, Denver, CO 80208-0204, ph 303-871-3790. sharter@du.edu
Self-worth. Global self-worth.

The Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents -1988 (click for details)


Instrument assesses self-perception for adolescents ( ages 14-18) in eight domains: scholastic competence, athletic competence, social acceptance, physical appearance, behavioral conduct, close friendship, romantic appeal, and job competence, and in addition expresses global self-worth. There are 45-items. Author: Susan Harter, PhD. 1988. Instrument available for use in research, program evaluation, and educational and clinical assessment at the group and inSPANidual level for fee to cover costs to reproduce and mail. Contact author: Dr. Susan Harter, University of Denver, Department of Psychology, 155 S. Race Street, Denver, CO 80208-0204, ph 303-871-3790. sharter@du.edu
Self-worth. Global self-worth.

Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) -2001-2008 (click for details)


Measure of trait EI theory. This is not related to traditional “emotional intelligence theory”. Trait has been referred to as emotional self-efficacy. Based on research of K.V. Petrides. EI is viewed in terms of personality. The measure has 15 sub-scales, under the following four factors: well-being, self-control, emotionality, and sociability. Available in 15 languages. Self-report inventory covers sampling domain of trait EI with 153-items on the questionnaire. There are multiple versions; a short version has 30-items to measure global trait EI. There are also two versions for children ages 8-12 years: TEIQue-CF, a 75-item inventory with 9 facets to measure global trait EI (administer time is 25 minutes), or TEIQue-CSF, a shorter version with 36-items (10-15 minutes). Author: K.V. Petrides, Ph.D. Copyright 2001-2008. Research being done on instrument. Contact: Dr. K.V. Petrides, Department of Psychology, University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AP, U.K.,k.petrides@ucl.uk . See also www.psychometriclab.com
Concept of Emotional Intelligence as Personality. Adult and child version. Research on-going.

Victimization -1993 (click for details)


Six-item self-report for elementary students (grades 3-4) regarding the student’s being a recipient of bullying, force and other negative behaviors from others at school during school year. Five possible responses reported on a frequency scale of 1 =never to 5=10 or more times. Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary school peer cruelty, bullying.

Victimization at School -2000 (click for details)


Six-item self –report for middle school students regarding the students’ recipient of negative behaviors from others at school ( e.g. how many times did someone steal something from your desk or locker; did someone physically attack you). Five possible responses reported on a frequency scale of 1 = never to 5 = 10 or more times. ). Developmental Studies Center. 2000. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Middle School peer victimization.

Visions of Morality Scale -1990 (click for details)


Designed to measure adolescents’ empathic and prosocial responses to situations he or she may encounter every day in high school. Fifteen statements reflect three dimensions of morality: private, interpersonal, and social. Students rate these on a seven-point Likert scale (would definitely do to I definitely would not do). Instrument in journal article as appendix: In Search of an Everyday Morality: The Development of a Measure, Adolescence, 1990, Vol. 25, n. 100, p. 923-943, author C.M. Shelton, D.P. McAdams. Contact: Regis Jesuit Community, 3333 Regis Blvd. Denver, CO 80221-1099.
Moral situation statements. Student response. Scale in journal article.

Work Avoidance Orientation -2000 (click for details)


A self-report for elementary students with 5-items about when a student feels best in school (oriented toward less challenging work and content). Five Likert-type scale responses (1= Disagree a lot to 5 = Agree a lot). Child Development Project. 1993. Contact. Developmental Studies Center, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305, Oakland, CA, 94606-5300, ph 800-666-7270. www.devstu.org
Elementary work ethic.