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Jack London says that character is the ultimate success factor. It doesn’t simply make the individual successful but those around you as well. Character impacts every individual in our sphere, and in today’s world made small by technology, it impacts those out of our sphere as well.

If you’re only now beginning, consider reading through some of our blogs from veteran practitioners for new ideas to implement. If you’re looking for a deeper dive into understanding The 11 Principles, join as a member for access to the Character Exchange in which community members from around the world can interact and learn together. Most importantly, engage with us. Be an active member of our community, and help us learn new and better ways to keep growing. Contribute resources so that others can begin their journey too.

The 11 Principles were developed after a study comparing a multitude of successful schools. Their common traits became the 11 Principles. Originally authored by Thomas Lickona, Eric Schaps and Catherine Lewis for Character.org, then the Character Education Partnership, in 1995. Learn more >>

Character.org provides lessons plans (coming soon), Promising Practices, workshops, and program evaluations. We also coordinate the Character.org National Forum. For more information on what we do, please feel free to contact us.

The key to the Character Exchange is all in the name. It’s a place to Exchange resources, converse about best practices and failures and become certified in the 11 Principles. Learn more >>

For over 20 years, Character.org has evaluated and certified character initiatives in schools through National and State Schools (and Districts) of Character. In a rigorous application and review process, schools must demonstrate successful implementation of all 11 Principles for the entire school community. We score the application, highlight the school’s strengths and offer suggestions for improvement.

Promising Practices are unique and replicable best practices based on the 11 Principles in schools, sports, higher education and other areas. These practices serve as valuable resources for others just getting started in their journey.

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